Take Out the (Windows) Trash

If you’re a Windows PC user, you know the term “bloatware”, or maybe “crapware”. Every consumer PC comes chock full of it. Free trials of games, cloud storage services and antivirus software. Half a dozen “helper” apps from the PC manufacturer. Pre-installed calling, chat, and shopping services. It’s a mess. But these unwanted apps aren’t

Giveaway for My New Book

The 4th edition is officially out!! You can order it here: Amazon Apress Barnes & Noble But I’m also running a contest to give away 15 free copies! Five top winners will receive a signed paperback copy of the book! Ten more winners will get a free digital (PDF) copy! Enter by clicking here or

Mind the Metadata

One of the major perks of modern smartphones is the built-in camera. When was the last time you actually carried (or bought) a separate camera? I used to love the little Canon Elph cameras because they were small enough to carry around on a belt holster. But it’s gathering dust now because my iPhone arguably

TikTok Boom

If you haven’t heard of TikTok, you’re probably not a teen. This relatively new social media service is very popular with the younger generation. It’s been downloaded 1.5 billion times. With this app, you can share short videos and … well, you know, goofy social media stuff. I’m old. I don’t get it, either. The

Bad Netgear Router Bug

If you have a Wi-Fi router made by Netgear, you need to pay close attention to this one. Most Netgear routers (79 models), even as old as 2007, are vulnerable. According to a report by security research firm Trend Micro, Netgear routers have a flaw that could allow a remote attacker (anywhere on the internet)

We’re Being Scanned

(This one is going to get a little technical, but hang with me.) Your WiFi router is the main portal to your home network. Most of us think of it as just a box that gives us a wireless connection, but this box almost always contains a firewall, as well. A firewall normally acts like

Beware the Evil Maid (Thunderspy)

Securing a computer on the internet today is hard enough. But trying to secure a computer against someone with direct physical access is a lot harder. This is the so-called “evil maid” attack: you leave your laptop in your hotel room, giving the maid unfettered access. But this can also be the “evil contractor” attack